Pearson plc ($PSON.L) Return on Assets of 0.074544: Is it Enough?

There are infinite tools to help determine whether a company is profitable or not.  One of the most popular ratios is the “Return on Assets” (aka ROA).  This score indicates how profitable a company is relative to its total assets.  The Return on Assets for Pearson plc (PSON.L) is 0.074544.  This number is calculated by dividing net income after tax by the company’s total assets.  A company that manages their assets well will have a higher return, while a company that manages their assets poorly will have a lower return.Stock market investors are typically searching for solid quality companies to help boost the portfolio. There are plenty of quality companies out there, the tricky part may be determining what constitutes as quality. Many investors look for companies that are solid sales leaders within a market that is growing. Going further, investors may be studying a company’s proven track record and gauging the competence of current management. Adding other factors such as brand recognition and prospects for steady growth, investors may eventually find a company that is worth taking the risk for future returns.

The FCF Yield 5yr Average is calculated by taking the five year average free cash flow of a company, and dividing it by the current enterprise value.  Enterprise Value is calculated by taking the market capitalization plus debt, minority interest and preferred shares, minus total cash and cash equivalents.  The average FCF of a company is determined by looking at the cash generated by operations of the company.  The Free Cash Flow Yield 5 Year Average of Pearson plc (PSON.L) is 0.043174. The FCF Yield currently stands at 0.05897.

Value Comp 1 / Value Comp 2

The Value Composite One (VC1) is a method that investors use to determine a company’s value. The VC1 of Pearson plc (PSON.L) is 15. A company with a value of 0 is thought to be an undervalued company, while a company with a value of 100 is considered an overvalued company. The VC1 is calculated using the price to book value, price to sales, EBITDA to EV, price to cash flow, and price to earnings. Similarly, the Value Composite Two (VC2) is calculated with the same ratios, but adds the Shareholder Yield. The Value Composite Two of Pearson plc (PSON.L) is 10.

VC3

Value Composite Three (VC3) is another adaptation of O’Shaughnessy’s value composite but here he combines the factors used in VC1 with buyback yield. This factor is interesting for investors who’re looking for stocks with the best value characteristics, but are indifferent to whether these companies pay a dividend.

VC3 is the combination of the following factors:

Price-to-Book
Price-to-Earnings
Price-to-Sales
EBITDA/EV
Price-to-Cash flow
Buyback Yield

As with the VC1 and VC2, companies are put into groups from 1 to 100 for each ratio and the individual scores are summed up. This total score is then put into groups again from 1 to 100. 1 is cheap, 100 is expensive. Pearson plc (PSON.L) has a VC3 of 10.

Book to Market

Pearson plc (PSON.L) has a book to market ratio of 0.702612. A ratio used to find the value of a company by comparing the book value of a firm to its market value. Book value is calculated by looking at the firm’s historical cost, or accounting value. Market value is determined in the stock market through its market capitalization.

Formula:

Book-to-Market Ratio= Common Shareholders Equity/Market Cap

Most investors are more familiar with P/B or Price-to-book. This is just the inverted value.

Price-to-Book Ratio=Market Cap/Common Shareholders Equity

Price to Sales

In the original edition of ‘What works on Wall Street’, O’Shaughnessy wrote that the single-best value factor was a company’s price-to-sales ratio (P/S). In his latest edition the P/S continues to perform well, but it was unseated by the value composites and EBITDA/EV due to 2 reasons: (1) A broader scope of analysis by using deciles and (2) two very bad years for P/S, e.g. 2007 and 2008.

A stock’s P/S is similar to its P/E ratio, but it measures the price of the company against its annual sales instead of earnings.

It’s calculated as follows:

Price-to-Sales Ratio = Market Cap/Net Sales or Revenues

Pearson plc (PSON.L) has a price to sales ratio of 1.556658.

Price to Earnings

This is undoubtedly the most popular value factor and for many investors the one true faith. It compares the price you pay per share compared to the earnings during the last 12 months. It’s calculated as follows:

Price-to-Earnings Ratio = Share Price/Diluted EPS excluding extra items

The P/E ratio for Pearson plc (PSON.L) is 10.953642.

Pearson plc (PSON.L) currently has an Altman Z score of 2.737635. The Z-Score for predicting bankruptcy was published in 1968 by Edward I. Altman, who was assistant professor of finance at New York University at that time. It measures the financial health of a company based on a set of income and balance sheet values. The Altman Z-Score predicts the probability that a firm will go bankrupt within 2 years. In its initial test, the Altman Z-Score was found to be 72% accurate in predicting bankruptcy two years before the event. In a series of subsequent tests, the model was found to be approximately 80%–90% accurate in predicting bankruptcy one year before the event.

Market watchers may also be following some quality ratios for Pearson plc (PSON.L). Robert Novy-Marx, a professor at the university of Rochester, discovered that gross profitability – a quality factor – has as much power predicting stock returns as traditional value metrics. He found that while other quality measures had some predictive power, especially on small caps and in conjunction with value measures, gross profitability generates significant excess returns as a stand alone strategy, especially on large cap stocks.The Gross profitability for (PSON.L) is 0.276534.

Successful investors are usually adept at expecting and reacting to sudden change. Things may be all roses when the markets are riding the bulls higher, but environments shift and can leave investors suddenly in the lurch. When times are good, investors may be well served by maintaining a watchful eye on the portfolio. Becoming complacent when everything seems to be working can become a disaster very quickly without the proper attention. Setting up a plan for different market scenarios can greatly benefit the investor. Routinely studying portfolio contents may help when the need to release some underperformers comes. Keeping close tabs on the portfolio may also help fend off a personal panic if events take a dramatic turn for the worse.

Receive News & Ratings Via Email - Enter your email address below to receive a concise daily summary of the latest news and analysts' ratings with MarketBeat.com's FREE daily email newsletter.